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Sunday, January 10, 2010

Weather for the birds

Many areas of North America and Europe are experiencing major winter challenges with heavy snow conditions and cold temperatures.  Here on the west coast of Canada and all down the coast to Southern California, the weather is much milder this year.  It really isn't fair for me to mention California and my location in the same breath because of the difference in temperatures for one thing, and the colour of the sky for another!  While Nikki is finding it necessary to water her garden, I am splooshing through puddles!


Recently there was an article in the local newspaper regarding Trumpeter Swans, the largest native waterfowl species in North America. They have an average wingspan of 196 cm (77") and can fly at 35 km per hour (20 mph). They average a lifespan of 12 years in the wild, although they can live twice that long in captivity.


Last month I posted this photo I took on a bright day.


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Here are a few images from yesterday's visit to the same spot. I took the video to try to capture the 'trumpet' of the swans.  There was a pod of at least 10 seals popping their heads up and down.  Very curious creatures :)



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I quite liked the artistic composition of this photo of a gull ~

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3 comments:

  1. Swans are such majestic birds! Our native variety is the Mute Swan.
    I agree about seals being curious creatures!
    Good pictures, especially of the gull.
    It's getting slighty warmer here and the snow is now getting slushy! Flighty xx

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  2. Hi Flighty ~ We have various swans, but the Trumpeter Swans were nearly finished off at one time so it's good to know they have increased in number. I think I met a couple of your Mute swans at Amberley, and they were quite aggressive, as they all probably are with young about. Glad you like the gull photo. In case you didn't get to make a snow frog before the slush, I've found mine that I'll post.

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  3. I'm amazed you could so clearly capture their little murmuring -- it sounds almost like they're commenting to each other under their breaths.

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