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Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Nature's palette

The sun has appeared as a large red orb as sunset approaches. Unfortunately, it was impossible for me to capture the brilliance of this amazing sight. The sun shone brightly, disappeared behind the clouds, and then showed its face again before being swallowed by the ocean. This slideshow doesn't come close to showing the glorious spectacle!




I loved this combination of pastels ~ perhaps  nature's brush that would colour the evening sky with an amazing blend of pinks and blues.

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The hanging basket on my sundeck has popped out something new! The purple spikes have produced pink flowers ~ I'm not familiar with this particular plant, so have no idea what it is called, but it's lovely :)

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With Bandido and the cherries being things of the past, I have been surveying the rest of the fruit to see if there will be any prospects for humankind. There are loads of grapes hanging from everywhere. I've noticed the ends of the vines have been nibbled by deer, and some of the flowers in the back have been food for a rabbit. I will take photos of the pears and apples as well.

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I noticed this young robin today, looking a little puffy-scruffy, and it seemed to be pondering about something.

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Meanwhile at the birdfeeder, a nuthatch was quite entertaining, and I got the message to top up the feeder. Hence my movie, entitled, "The Nutty Little Nuthatch".

6 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness! What you did manage to capture is gorgeous. I think your purple little upstart is tradescantia pallida -- very exotic looking as the dramatic leaves rival the sweet little flowers. I saw a flash of bright yellow in the garden the other day -- I wonder if it was a relative of your cute nuthatch.

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  2. Hi Nikki ~ I'm glad you enjoyed the sunset ~ it was one of those 'awestruck' evenings! Thanks so much for the plant identification of tradescantia pallida. I googled it, and that's it for sure :) Now I know that it is a perennial, I maybe able to winter it ~ also I'll keep it in the basket as I see it can be an invasive plant. I was suprised when I saw it flower do prettily. Do you have this plant?
    I'm sure my little nuthatches will be delighted to hear about their So. Cal. relatives ~ they certainly spread over a large range of the continent and beyond. Today I noticed one taking a sip from the hummingbird feeder ;) Sometimes there are many of them flitting around the bird feeder ~ other little birds that try to share are juncos and chickadees.

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  3. Oops - that would be "so prettily" rather than "do prettily" ...LOL

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  4. That's a wonderful spectacle which I've seen once or twice in Cornwall.
    Enjoy the fruit, that is if you're left any to eat!
    I love your scruffy robin and nutty nuthatch! Flighty xx

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  5. Lovely sunsets, especially with the Sun reflected in the water. As you say a camera never seems to capture the full magic of the occasion.

    What a busy little nuthatch, seems very fussy as to which peanut to choose.

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  6. It's great you've captured those pink skies. I've noticed the same here just lately. I always marvel at them. The fodder in your garden is sure temptation for all resident and passing wildlife! I agree, the mystery plant is Tradescantia. I can use it as a perennial in my garden. x

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